Rituals and Recovery

This week I have another coronavirus coping strategy for Freelancers to r reand it boils down to this—do what you’ve always done, except when you have to pivot or adapt. Psychologists, sociologists and others who observe human behavior know that routines and rituals have real power. Michael Norton, professor at Harvard Business School and member of Harvard’s Behavioral Insights Group and Francesca Gino, professor of organizational psychology at Harvard Business School and author of Sidetracked: Why our Decisions get Derailed (2013) found that routines and rituals are stabilizers that ground us and help us to keep going when we’re feeling out of sorts, when we’re grieving the loss of a loved they keep families and friends closer they help to maintain the bond between martial partners.

There is a psychological benefit when, in times of uncertainty and stress, we return to our old routines and habits. Some routines that we turn to can be harmful, it is true. Binge eating, smoking and drinking come to mind. If those activities have been among your habits, I suggest that you leave them in the past. As we crawl our way through the coronavirus shutdown it will be the good rituals and habits, the sometimes silly and often idiosyncratic ways about us, that will nurture us and give us the strength and determination to see our way through this long dark tunnel.

Weddings, christenings, funerals and holiday dinners are all steeped in ritual (that is, habit). That is why whenever someone makes a change to the Thanksgiving or Easter dinner menu, there might be a mini riot. Even those who don’t love mashed turnip or mincemeat pie may complain long and loud if those items are not served on the fourth Thursday in November. The decision to serve an Easter ham or Easter lamb could lead to an armed standoff.

Routines and rituals are often small habits. One always wakes up at a certain hour, so as not to feel lazy. One always exercises in the morning (or in the evening) because at first it fits a schedule but now it is defining act that supports and even comforts.

Oddly, Norton and Franco found that a ritual or routine did not have to be practical or useful to be habit-forming and compelling. Competitive athletes are known to sometimes wear a favorite pair of socks or necklace, or eat a certain food for the pre-competition dinner because they feel the need for a good luck charm.

So what can you do to keep it together as you push through what is probably the most formidable challenge a Freelance consultant will face? As I said earlier, keep doing what you’ve been doing. If you always woke up at 6:30 AM on the weekdays, then continue to do so. If you always headed out to the gym at 7:00 AM, here is where you pivot and make an adaptation. Because gyms are closed, devise a combination run and power walk routine that lasts for 30 minutes.

This is a holiday week for Christians and Jews and I suggest that you apply the ritual usually practiced during the December holidays and send cards to your clients. Because you don’t know who is working from home and who is in the office, send an e-card (I use Jacquie Lawson).

Create a new ritual and visit online gig economy sites such as LinkedIn and Upwork. Tell yourself that you’ll check in on Tuesdays and Thursdays (or Mondays and Wednesdays) and use self-discipline to keep the routine going throughout the shutdown and beyond, because we all need money and we need lots more cash than the government stimulus will provide.

Another ritual that you can either continue , learn, or resuscitate is meditation and focused breathing. Both medical and psychological research has demonstrated that this technique promotes healing of the body and mind.

Thanks for reading,

Kim

Photograph: Kim Clark. Long-time Boston favorite Giacomo’s Ristorante pivots out of sit-down service and into takeouts, per the Commonwealth of Massachusetts coronavirus rules.

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