Crowdfunding for a Business

What do you do when you need money to either launch or expand your business venture and the bank won’t give you enough money? For many entrepreneurs, crowdfunding is the answer. Originally used to fund charity drives or creative projects like recording music or film making, crowdfunding is now recommended as a business financing strategy by organizations that support aspiring entrepreneurs.

That said, I remain skeptical. I understand the allure of crowdfunding—people will give someone money to finance a creative project or business venture and that person will, ideally, achieve the goal without taking on debt. In exchange for the financial support, the entrepreneur, in many cases, will promise to give backers a reward, or even a small equity stake (ownership) for certain investors.

But ask yourself—why would a total stranger contribute to a crowdfunding campaign for a start-up, unless it’s a not-for-profit venture and I believe in the cause and would like to support it? Well, some folks are just of a mind to be a part of someone’s success and that’s the best reward. However, campaigners are advised to align the reward offered with the project.

If the campaign will fund the production of a big special event, for instance, the campaigner might offer free admission, backstage passes, or even a chance to hop up onstage and jam with the band. For consumer products, the most obvious reward would be to provide backers with a digital or physical copy of the item in advance, or offer a purchase price that is far less than the typical retail value. Bear in mind that creativity pays: among the most consistently popular rewards are those that offer personal or unique touches, or provide singular opportunities, e.g, lunch with the founders or the inclusion of donors’ names in the new software product’s credits.

Since there is growing interest in the entrepreneurial community about this nontraditional funding source, I decided to research. Here’s the first half of what I learned. Next week, I’ll follow-up and examine how one might create a successful crowdfunding campaign for a business.

WHICH PLATFORM IS FOR YOU?

CircleUp—Best for fitness, food & beverage, technology

  • Campaign types: Equity, credit
  • Industry focus: Early-stage consumer brands
  • Funds you can keep: All or nothing
  • Funding fees: N/A
  • Payment fees (US): N/A
  • Startup locations allowed: Worldwide

If you’re an entrepreneur working to get your consumer product on the market, CircleUp offers an excellent array of services, including a platform for connecting with accredited investors, insights from machine-learning technology and access to special lines of credit for start-ups. Accredited investors must have a net worth of at least $1 million and earnings of $200,000 a year or more, per SEC regulations. In other words, the investors are quite affluent and capable of writing big checks.

While the focus is on early-stage companies, the platform is nevertheless best suited for more established start-ups looking to scale, rather than companies in their infancy.  CircleUp doesn’t charge any fees for friend and family investments and provides special access to funding through partnerships with Procter & Gamble and General Mills. 

Fundable

  • Campaign types: Equity, rewards
  • Industry focus: Healthy startups ready to expand
  • Funds you can keep: Whatever you raise for equity; all or nothing for rewards
  • Funding fees: $179 monthly subscription
  • Payment fees (US): 3.5% + $0.30 per transaction for reward campaigns
  • Start-up locations allowed: Must be headquartered in the US

Most crowdfunding platforms, whether equity or reward, take a percentage of funds raised. However, this platform just charges a flat monthly subscription fee. As long as you’re subscribed, you can create campaigns to raise money.

The flat fee makes it a great deal for many successful crowdfunding campaigns. The only problem is that campaigners must pay the fee whether or not one is successful. A failed campaign will lose you money, so Fundable is best for start-ups that have a high-potential business model.

But if you’d like a little extra help with your campaign, Fundable offers consulting services and will do everything from design assets to market your campaign. These consulting services do cost more than Fundable’s monthly fee; contact Fundable to obtain pricing.

GoFundMe—Best for not-for-profits and charitable causes

  • Campaign types: Reward, donation
  • Industry focus: People and causes
  • Funds you can keep: Whatever you raise
  • Funding fees: 0% for personal campaigns in the US; 5% for charities and countries outside the US
  • Payment fees: 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction
  • Start-up locations allowed: 19 countries

GoFundMe campaigns are donation-based and focus on not-for-profit start-ups and charities. If you operate a not-for-profit, or are trying to raise money for a cause, this is the preferred platform.

IFundWomen—Best for women entrepreneurs

  • Campaign type: Reward
  • Industry focus: Women-led businesses
  • Funds you can keep: Whatever you raise
  • Funding fees: 5% of all funds raised
  • Payment fees (US): 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction
  • Start-up locations allowed: 23 countries

Women entrepreneurs, who own a growing share of new startups, still face significant challenges in securing investment capital to get their businesses off the ground. iFundWomen offers a a solution to some of those challenges. The founders created the platform as a “fundraising ecosystem for women-led startups and small businesses.” It also provides coaching, marketing and other services for start-up owners.

Unlike some reward-based crowdfunding sites, iFundWomen lets campaigners keep whatever funds they raise. Of the money the site earns from funding fees, 20% goes back into supporting campaigns and services that benefit women business owners.

Indiegogo

  • Campaign types: Reward, equity
  • Industry focus: Tech and innovation
  • Funds you can keep: All or nothing; whatever you raise
  • Funding fees: 5%
  • Payment fees (US): 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction
  • Start-up locations allowed: Worldwide

A big plus is that Indiegogo allows campaigners to choose to structure either a fixed or flexible funding arrangement for your campaign. If you choose flexible funding, you still get the money even if you don’t fully reach your goal. Fixed funding is the same as all campaigns on Kickstarter. Reach your funding goal or the funds are returned to prospective backers (see below). Either way, campaigners must deliver the equity and/or rewards that you promised to supporters.

The site has millions of visitors and the traffic can, in theory, be great for your campaign. If you get featured in your category, your project will be exposed to a ton of people and possibly bringing in many backers. The problem with the mega-sites is that it’s difficult to get featured and your campaign can easily get lost in a sea of other aspirants.

Kickstarter

  • Campaign type: Reward
  • Industry focus: Creative arts
  • Funds you can keep: All or nothing
  • Funding fees: 5% of successful campaigns
  • Payment fees (US): 3% + $0.20 per pledge $10 and over; 5% + $0.05 per pledge under $10
  • Start-up locations allowed: US, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the Netherlands

Red alert people! Kickstarter campaigns are all or nothing. Meaning, if you can’t meet or exceed your funding goal, all the money is returned to your prospective backers. You had better know that you have enough check-writing friends to get your campaign to the first milestone and that the strength of your project, supported by a very compelling marketing outreach, will carry you across the finish line.

On top of that, the platform is highly competitive and carefully selects the projects allowed on the site. You cannot fund just any business on Kickstarter—you must “create something to share with others.” Your project also needs to fall under one of site’s curated categories, such as arts and crafts, fashion and design, film and photography, games, and technology.

Moreover, investors will expect some type of reward, so you’ll need something of value for the swag bag you must distribute to investors (and you must categorize rewards by their value, to correspond with the amount of donations). So if you’re trying to scale your Public Relations business, what might your reward be—3 years of free press releases? I dunno.

Kiva—Best for micro-loans

  • Campaign type: Debt
  • Industry focus: Startups interested in microloans
  • Funds you can keep: All or nothing
  • Funding fees: N/A
  • Payment fees (US): N/A
  • Start-up locations allowed: United States

If you will accept taking on debt, this not-for-profit style platform could be your most affordable option. Successfully funded Kiva campaigns give your start-up a 0% interest loan, the best of all borrowing options.

The loan must be repaid, but there are no funding or payment fees for you to worry about. Since Kiva requires that you prove your social capital by kicking off your campaign with donations from family and friends, that means convincing people you know to fund your business—but were’t you going to do that anyway?

Note that Kiva loans top out at $10,000; this is micro loan territory. But if you want affordable debt crowdfunding for your small fundraising goals, Kiva’s worth a look.

Publishizer

  • Campaign type: Equity
  • Industry focus: Book publishing
  • Funds you can keep: Whatever you raise
  • Funding fees: 30% of money raised
  • Payment fees (US): 2% – 4% per PayPal transaction
  • Start-up locations allowed: United States

Not all crowdfunding sites are giants, as are GoFundMe, Indiegogo and Kickstarter. In fact, most are smaller, niche-specific platforms, such as Publishizer, which was designed specifically to help authors crowdfund their books. Authors can certainly still use Kickstarter or Indiegogo, but this platform gives the benefit of having a specialized audience that supports authors and books.

Republic

  • Campaign types: Equity, reward
  • Industry focus: Start-ups with a focus on diversity
  • Funds you can keep: All or nothing
  • Funding fees: 6% for the startup + 2% Crowd SAFE fee
  • Payment fees (US): 3.5% per transaction
  • Start-up locations allowed: United States

As an equity-focused crowdinvesting platform, Republic is the new kid on the block and with it’s highly selective curated selection of companies, it’s not for everyone. But for growing U.S. companies with large revenue potential, Republic’s 95% success rate for selected campaigns make it one of the most enticing platforms for connecting with willing investors. Furthermore, Republic also looks for organizations with diverse founder teams.

SeedInvest

  • Campaign type: Equity
  • Industry focus: Technology startups
  • Funds you can keep: All or nothing
  • Funding fees: 7.5% of successful campaigns + 5% equity fee
  • Payment fees (US): $0 paid by the startup; 2% paid by the investor
  • Start-up locations allowed: United States

Founded by MBA graduates and experienced investors, SeedInvest started as a way to give technology startups access to capital from people willing to make sizeable equity investments.

To start, you need at least a minimum viable product or prototype, proof of concept and two or more team members. If you make the cut, you’ll get access to both accredited and non-accredited investors for campaigns starting at $100,000.

SeedInvest’s biggest drawback is its expensive 7.5% placement fee on all successfully funded campaigns. Still, the site has a growing base of investors and successful companies, as well as a positive reputation in the entrepreneur community.

I’ll be back next week with information on how to set up your campaign. Thanks for reading,

Kim

Photograph: ©David Cairns/ Getty Images. Roulette at the Playboy Club in London, England early 1960s

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s